Other web Sites
Harmonica Blues  Harmonica Amps
Archives Home
Years
 · 1992
 · 1993
 · 1994
 · 1995
 · 1996
 · 1997
 · 1998
 · 1999
 · 2000
 · 2001
 · 2002
 · 2003
Amplified Blues Harmonica BBS
Search:
vintage harmonica microphone,the original by brush development,cleveland,OH,1939

SHURE MIC ELEMENT 99AA556 PG controlled magnetic harp low impedance

Vintage 1960's Electro Voice 606 harp microphone old antique midcentury used # 4

Built-in Microphone keyboard harmonica HAMMOND PRO-44H "HAMMOND 44"

VINTAGE TWEED WOVEN CLOTH HARP MIC CABLE SHURE JT-30 EV

New HAMMOND B-24H Microphone Built-in 24-note Bass keyboard Harmonica Japan HTF

NEW! Digital Reference Red Howler Dynamic Professional Harmonica Mic Microphone

Vintage Sonotone Voice of Music CM10a Harp Microphone, Nice Chrome Finish, Stand

Sonotone CM-10A Harp Mic - Guitar Cord Ready

Custom White Powder Shure 520 Bullet Harmonica, Harp Mic, 1955 Shure CR Element

Vintage47amps "Chicago Blues" Fat Tone Tube Microphone/Harmonica T-Shirt

Vintage47amps "Chicago Blues" Fat Tone Tube Microphone/Harmonica T-Shirt

Vintage47amps "Chicago Blues" Fat Tone Tube Microphone/Harmonica T-Shirt

Vintage harp microphone 1950s Electro Voice 635 RARE old used deco antique

Vintage BeyerDynamics M640N Dynamic Microphone Mic Harp Guitar Used w Stand

Beautiful Custom HARP MIC with EXCELLENT Vintage Shure Green Bullet Tone!

Vintage Shure 99A86 Controlled Magnetic High Impedance Mic Element Harmonica

Olson Green Bullet M 105 Harmonica Microphone with Cord, Stand, and Jack

Vintage Shure PE53 dynamic Spher-O-Dyne Hi-Z microphone harp mic

Custom Turner Harmonica Microphone

NEW JTS CX-520D Harmonica Microphone with 1/4 Inch Plug FREE SHIP! BUY IT NOW!!

David Bogan Super tube amp JX50 807 audio 13 TUBES! mic stereo Guitar harp 6SN7

Vintage Astatic T3 T-3 Microphone Crystal Harp Harmonica With Stand and Case

VINTAGE ASTATIC 333-3 CRYSTAL HARP MIC MICROPHONE

Crystal Microphone element - guitar harp mic pickup vintage fuzz sound part

Custom Wood Hi-Z & Lo-Z Bullet Style Ceramic & Magnetic Harmonica Microphone Set

Shure 520DX Green Bullet Harmonica Microphone Volume control Dynamic

Bottle 'O Blues Harmonica Microphone

VINTAGE RARE CALRAD D-250 DYNAMIC HARP MICROPHONE MIC MADE IN JAPAN

Unique 1960s Vintage Shure 560 Dynamic Harp Lavalier Microphone in Original Box

Audix Fireball V Harmonica and Beatbox Vocal Microphone Fire Ball 5 Mic NEW

2 - Crystal Microphone element - guitar harp mic pickup vintage fuzz sound part

Vintage Astatic Model 200 Bullet Harp Microphone 1940s-50s w/ Handle

Vintage Sonotone Voice of Music CM10a Harp Microphone, Nice Chrome Finish, Stand

Vintage Shure Unisphere A PE-585 Dynamic Microphone, High Impedance. Harp Player

Lot 5 - Vintage Shure Controlled Reluctance Harp Microphone - SHELLS ONLY

Vintage 1955 99T86 Shure Mic Element Harp Harmonica Low-Z 40 ohm

Hohner Model 1490 Blues Blaster Harmonica Microphone Chicago Blues Tone Mic New

Assorted Shure, Turner, RCA Vintage Harp Mic Elements

Vintage 1950s Electro-Voice 926 Crystal Microphone Perfect Retro Blues Harp Mic!

Harp-L Archives

[Previous Message] [Next Message]
[Next in Thread]
[Start of Thread] [End of Thread]

From: Chri~world.com
Date: Wed, 24 Jan 1996 18:27:58 -0800
Subject: Re: Chops

> Off the equipment subject: I seem to be able to come up with an endless
>series
>of riffs (which are all variations of about three riffs, but that's another
>problem entirely) but can never put them into anything that resembles a
>tune
>or a solo. I usually wind up playing the riff du jour as a rhythm, then
>try to
>embellish, but it never turns into anything but a boring rhythm line. I'd be

>interested to know how folks go about turning notes into music . . . almost
>everything I hear is about how to get through single notes to riffs, not
>much
>beyond.

I once asked an old friend of mine (who was the greatest pianist I've
ever known) if he would teach me how to play jazz piano. He responded by
saying "No, but I'll refer you to the best music teacher in the world."
I asked him "Who." He pointed to my ears.

His point (for all the Homer Simpsons out there) is that listening is the
BEST way to learn to play music, especially improvised music. LISTEN.
For harmonica players, start by listening to the best. Sonny Boy I & II,
Little Walter, Big Walter Horton, etc. When your ears start hurting,
listen some more. Listen until you can start to hear the notes before
they are played (Theloniuos Monk is hardest to do this with). When you
can hear the notes in your head, then, and only then, you can tranfer
them to your instrument. That's where the second part takes over,
PRACTICE.

Many people feel that practice is the most important part of playing, but
I personally feel that listening is more important. You can practice
licks and riffs all day, and wind up with the greatest technique of
anyone. But when you play, all you'll wind up with is a series of
randomly generate licks and riffs (John Popper? ... no flames please).

Watch some of the best musicians out there. My favorite is Stevie Ray
Vaughan. When he plays, you can tell he's got the chops, but to me it
looks as if his guitar is more of an extension to his body than a musical
instrument he playing. He is hearing (and feeling) music and that music
is exactly what you hear. Its like it goes straight from his brain (or
soul) to his Vibroverb...

Anyways, that's my thoughts...

Chris